"be humble for you are made of earth,
be noble for you are made of stars"
olivia. writer. over-enthusiast. i'm basically just a student at washington college with a tendency for falling in love with words and strangers.
Washington College presents: ARCADIA

wacforbeginners:

Soo I haven’t been posting too much lately, mea culpa.

But for the past couple weeks I, and my fellow blogger Olivia, have been hard at work on the Drama Department’s production, Arcadia by Tom Stoppard. 

It’s been a semester-long affair, starting the first week we returned from winter break and opening just two weeks before finals. 

The play has been an amazing, rewarding experience that I will surely miss after the final bow this Saturday. 

Tomorrow, Wednesday, is opening night. And I’ve never been more excited about an opening night than I have now.

The show runs from April 16-19. On Wednesday through Friday, the show begins at 8, and on Saturday, showtime is 1:30.

Come see it. It’s a masterpiece. 

Go Shorrmen 

Seconded. You can expect a long-winded from me after this weekend is over. :)

  Anonymous said:
When do you get a college email?

if I remember correctly, you get your college email at advising day (when you register for classes and everything else).

  Anonymous said:
How do you become a student blogger? I'll be part of Washington Colleges incoming class!!

Actually, they found me! I received an email in early june from the admissions office wondering if I would be interested in becoming one.

If you are really interested though, I would suggest emailing Aundra Weissert, as she is my boss. :) Her email is: aweissert2(at)washcoll.edu

22 College Seniors On Their Advice To College Freshmen

  1. Go out, get drunk, hook up…but make sure that’s never the most interesting thing about you.
  2. Do not ever underestimate your talent. On two different occasions, I came out of two professors’ office hours crying because both of them couldn’t believe my GPA was as low as it was. One was an English professor and the other was a journalism professor, and I was doing really well in both their classes. I will never forget the look of wild confusion on each of their faces when I shared with them the one detail that could prevent me from studying abroad. Both professors praised my work so highly and told me I was capable of so much more than the grades I was receiving. I walked out crying because, for the first time in my life, I believed them.
  3. Remember that you’re not in high school anymore and that nobody cares what you were like in high school. It’s ok to take good memories from high school with you to college, but make sure not to get caught up in them. You’re going to want to make all new friends and have all new experiences in college and if you stay too attached to your high school experience, you won’t be open to everything that high school has to offer. Don’t focus on what made you, you in high school. Figure out what your mark in college is going to be—and figure out with whom you’re going to make it.
  4. Freshman year is a huge transition period, and I wish I had understood that and handled it with more grace. Feel your feelings and know that it will be easier one day, once you’ve found the right people.
  5. College is, for most of us, the first time we all truly venture out on our own and begin the work of deciding who we will become. It is a beautiful time of discovery and one that you wont get to repeat. So if I may, can I ask one thing of you? Your grades are important, and parties are fun, but make sure you take some time for yourself once in a while, away from it all. Even if it’s for 10 or 15 minutes, once a week, find a place where you can sit and be still, without a care or worry on your mind. For me, it has made all the difference.
  6. Don’t feel like you need to be best friends with the people in your hall because of your proximity. Be selective about those who get to spend time with you.
  7. For the love of God…FOR THE LOVE OF YOURSELF…don’t ever, ever let yourself become someone’s side bitch. You are main bitch material, dammit! It’s been three and a half years, and I am still grappling with that concept. Please, please know that you don’t deserve to be waiting around for his (or her) text messages, and you shouldn’t be watching him text his ex-girlfriend while both of you are on a date. When he asks, “where is your self-respect?” after waking up next to you and then hooking up with your good friend that night, make sure to first, punch him square in the face, and to second, get him the fuck out of your life. Stop waiting around for all those losers to see how fucking awesome you are, and make time for the ones that knew it the moment they met you.
  8. Get out there, join a club, and join the community. 
I know alcohol and the bar scene is new and exciting, but be safe and try not to be too stupid. I made too many mistakes like that as an 18 year old. It’s not fun to be remembered as the girl who made out with 12 people in two hours.
  9. Everyone is probably telling you right now that these will be the happiest four years of your life. What they probably aren’t telling you is that these will also be some of the worst years of your life. In college you will feel on top of the world and utterly defeated (sometimes in the same day). So just try to remember that you’re not doing anything wrong if you’re having a hard time. And before you jump to any conclusions about how much happier everyone else is, and how much more fun they’re having than you, go sit down and talk to a friend. You’d be surprised by how many people feel lost and directionless at least some point in their college careers.
  10. Try to learn something new, whether it’s about yourself or what you’re studying. School is still so much fun, and it’s the last time you’re going to get the chance. Learn the things you can’t learn outside a classroom, though those things can often be more important.
  11. 
Please please please don’t be afraid to befriend seniors. Some of my most meaningful relationships of my freshman year, if not my entire college experience, were the ones I had with seniors when I was a freshman. I want nothing more than to give that kind of meaning to someone new. I want you to do well, and I want to pass on a legacy at this school through people like you. Also, you guys are precious, and you have a ton of cafeteria swipes. Upperclassmen friends are not hard to make if endless fries and Lucky Charms are involved. 
One of my meaningful friends who was a senior when I was a freshman told me just a few weeks ago that my personality hasn’t changed, just that I’ve learned to navigate the world better. And that’s all you need to learn. Enjoy these next four years, ’cause they zoom away a hundred times faster than you think they will. Mine did, and I wish that I was paying more attention to them.
  12. My advice for freshmen is to trust their gut in all decisions they make. Do whatever YOU feel most comfortable with regardless of what your friends may think. Be friends with everyone and don’t stand for “groups” “your crew” “your girls” because in most cases that’s just a euphemism for a clique.
  13. Boys suck. Accept defeat and eat another donut.
  14. I think one of my favorite quotes does a pretty good job at summarizing the advice I would give: “For what it’s worth: it’s never too late to be whoever you want to be. I hope you live a life you’re proud of, and if you find that you’re not, I hope you have the strength to start all over again.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald
  15. Going to the cafeteria alone is not weird; it means you’re okay with yourself.
  16. I won’t lie to you: College is going to turn your world upside down in both the best and worst ways possible. You will lose yourself, and you will find yourself again. You will most likely change your major, and your roommates will probably become your best friends. Inevitably, you will see more of them than you ever thought you’d want to (literally – my roommates frequently parade around my apartment in just t-shirts and underwear). But, they are also the people who will come to know you better than you know yourself and some days you are really going to need that. Never let the fear of failure inhibit you from doing what you know you actually want to do. As cliché as this is about to sound, be sure to revel in every bit of these next four years because it will go faster than you could ever imagine.
  17. Remember, everyone and I mean EVERYONE has a story so before judging or assuming try to just listen. I still catch myself everyday guilty of this, assuming someone is crabby for no reason or being rude just to be rude– you’ll be amazed at the stories you hear when you let someone talk for five minutes.
  18. Take yourself out of your comfort zone. Make yourself deliberately uncomfortable. It is an unparalleled character-building exercise, and you might be able to discern the things you want out of life as well as the things you don’t as a result.
  19. You should know that change is both necessary and inevitable, so try to embrace it as best as you can. Growth is a beautiful, incredibly bittersweet process and there is (I’ve learned) nothing to fear from it. At the end of the day, that’s what you’re here for: to learn, to blossom, and to flourish into whoever it is you decide you’re going to be. Part of that process though, is making mistakes; so be kind to yourself, forgive yourself, and then, keep going. The only thing you’ll regret over these next four years are the things you didn’t do, so make sure you do everything you can; go out on weeknights, dress up for themed parties, attend as many of your university’s sporting events as you can, and always call home at least once a week. Do things you never gave yourself the liberty to do in high school, study abroad, revel in your newfound independence in whatever way you see fit, spend at least one summer on campus, and, perhaps most importantly, when you do finally find your voice – don’t ever be afraid to use it.
  20. Participate in EVERYTHING, even if its not your thing you’ll probably find that if you participate you always have fun. Do not be that kid who is “too cool for school” because you will miss out.
  21. A candle loses no light when lighting others. Build others up whenever you can, support those close to you and help whoever you can – you never know when the tables will turn!
  22. I’m not sure I can think of any better advice than that given by Anna Quindlen in one of her commencement speeches. As a freshman I rolled my eyes at these words, I thought good grades, hard work, and sleep deprivation were the answer. For any freshman who feels the same, I ask you to consider Quindlen’s advice…
    “There will be hundreds of people out there with your same degree; there will be thousands of people doing what you want to do for a living. But you will be the only person alive who has sole custody of your life. Your particular life. Your entire life. Not just your life at a desk, or your life on a bus, or in a car, or at the computer. Not just the life of your minds, but the life of your heart. Not just your bank account, but your soul. People don’t talk about the soul very much anymore. It’s so much easier to write a resume than to craft a spirit. But a resume is a cold comfort on a winter night, or when you’re sad, or broke, or lonely, or when you’ve gotten back the test results and they’re not so good. So here is what I wanted to tell you today:
    Get a life. A real life, not a manic pursuit of the next promotion, the bigger paycheck, the larger house. Do you think you’d care so very much about those things if you blew an aneurysm one afternoon, or found a lump in your breast? Get a life in which you notice the smell of salt water pushing itself on a breeze over Seaside Heights, a life in which you stop and watch how a red-tailed hawk circles over the water gap or the way a baby scowls with concentration when she tries to pick up a cheerio with her thumb and first finger. Get a life in which you are not alone. Find people you love, and who love you. And remember that love is not leisure, it is work. Each time you look at your diploma, remember that you are still a student, still learning how to best treasure your connection to others. Pick up the phone. Send an e-mail. Write a letter. Kiss your Mom. Hug your Dad. Get a life in which you are generous. Look around at the azaleas in the suburban neighborhood where you grew up; look at a full moon hanging silver in a black, black sky on a cold night. And realize that life is the best thing ever, and that you have no business taking it for granted. Care so deeply about its goodness that you want to spread it around. Once in a while take money you would have spent on beers and give it to charity. Work in a soup kitchen. Be a big brother or sister. All of you want to do well. But if you do not do good, too, then doing well will never be enough.”  

(Source: thoughtcatalog.com)

things people never told you about college:

you will spend as much of your free time sleeping as possible

journal entry: bittersweet

it’s weird to think that i’m already three-quarters of the way done with my freshman year of college. with spring break next week, I’ve taken to reflecting and organizing my thoughts about going to school here.

my first semester was one of sky-high ups and lows as far down as they come. I struggled with social anxiety and feelings of depression, but at the same time, I experienced moments of elation that surpassed all those before them. I felt anger and disdain towards people in a capacity that i never had before, and an overwhelming sense of appreciation for the people around me. I learned a lot about myself and who I wanted (and didn’t want) to be.

and this semester has turned everything in on its head. i felt incredibly lost at the beginning, and more tired than I have been since junior year of high school. there were a lot of friends I lost, but even more that I gained. this semester I found a community of friends, and discovered a sense of belonging, something I’ve been searching for years to find.

but washington college isn’t heaven. it’s not the fields of elysium or a castle on the clouds. it’s not magic, it’s a school. and it’s what you make of it. I’m lucky I guess, that I found a school that feels like home. to be honest, there are a number of people who don’t feel the same way I do. and I want to be candid:

this blog is biased.

and it’s not because I get paid for it (i do) but because it’s hard not to write about the things that make you happy. it’s hard not to gush about a school that made you feel better about education than 7 years of public schooling. because as much as this blog is to share my school, it’s also to share my life. when i look back, years from now, i’d rather remember the good and not the bad. i’d prefer to look fondly on the nights spent stargazing or how amazing my experience at birthday ball was, rather than a bad night of drinking or fighting with my friends about trivial matters.

washington college isn’t for everyone. it was perfect for me in ways that might drive a different student up the wall. wac is a small school, it’s intimate, a little laid-back at times, a little rowdy at others. maybe it’s because I’m still a bright-eyed freshman, but i like to think that over the next four years washington college is a place where i can continue to feel like I can be myself.

cheers,
olivia

journal entry: birthday ball

unfortunately, i was having so much fun on saturday that I didn’t get very many pictures of birthday ball. well, i say “unfortunately” but isn’t it a good thing? to be enjoying yourself so much and to be so caught up in the moment, you don’t even think to take pictures because you know that it will stick in your memory for years?

a couple of weekends ago, i meth two wonderful girls named holly and julie, and let me just tell you they are two fantastic amazing wonderful people. i kinda love ‘em a lot. anyway, we spent most of the day together. starting with the lacrosse game against Goucher, i chilled with them and some of the KA brothers (pretty cool guys) and we enjoyed the sunshine and clean air of a winter giving hopes for spring. after the second half, we shifted from the bleachers to the hillside and there’s really only one word that sums up how fun that was: puppies. a lot of people that bring their dogs and there are a lot of dogs that are only ten weeks old and the cutest freaking things ever.

moving forward, after the game, julie and I brought our stuff to holly’s room and then went to hang out at talbot. I made tea (and got some weird looks from some of the brothers) and we grabbed chinese before heading back to get ready.

the dance itself was spectacular. the decorations were amazing, the dj was on point, and i was there with people that make me happy.

can’t wait for next year!

cheers,
olivia

p.s. realised that this is has been in my drafts for about a week, so sorry for the late post. :\

went frolicking in the snow last night

a word to the wise: look before you leap

i sprained my foot and had to go to the hospital today

a word to the wise

it’s okay to miss class. be aware of the absences you’re allowed and know that if the cold medicine you took because you’re sicker than sick is making you feel like you’re about to pass out, you don’t have to go to english class.

don’t make a habit of missing class, but keep in mind that you can’t have a healthy mind without a healthy body.